Lost Rambling

Lost has a lot of potential, but doesn’t apply himself.

Monday, November 13, 2006

Pointless Killing

The other day fortunately for me, Dr. Richard Bartle posted “Pointless Killing”. While I would like to think that Dr. Bartle had read my post suggesting that I feel that current MMO game design isn’t ready for dynamic content. But my head isn’t that big and the inspiration is more likely his on me (as I have commented before that I hold Dr. Bartle’s writings in high regard and that they have influenced many of my opinions).

In the comments, Bart Stewart mentions “Marc Miller's Traveller RPG”, which honestly I haven’t heard of before or had much time to research. But it does sound like an interest gaming system where players start at an advanced point and are able to skip ahead to what is most often the “fun” part.

Many other people warn of trading one grind for another, which is something that I’ve warned others of also “What's in a name? That which we call a time sink by any other word would take just as long.” Yes I’m strange, but it still amuses me.

But this still leaves the burning question. What core game gaming system will give a sense of advancement without feeling like a grind and will be able to adjust to a dynamic content world?

The certainly are some interesting ideas.
* Monsters and players would maintain the same hit points, but would increase in abilities based on levels. (I can not find comment to credit it right now)
* A complete social based rating. Pemberly Online (Pete Border)
* Exploring bonus’ (Brian “Psychochild” Green)
* Many citing Eve Online game play system.
* Various training methods (David (Talaen))

Clearly sticking all these ideas in a blend and hoping that it comes out perfect is silly. Still, the right blending of ideas such as these will most likely be a huge success.

Also while you are visiting Terra Nova, I suggest reading “Superstition” (Small note: The original post should have been wisps, not ghosts in its UO ref.)

2 Comments:

  • At 3:10 AM, Anonymous Richard Bartle said…

    >While I would like to think that Dr. Bartle had read my post

    I hadn't. It's something I've been meaning to write for about 3 months, but I only just got around to doing so.

    >I feel that current MMO game design isn’t ready for dynamic content.

    The design is, but the players may not be.

    >Clearly sticking all these ideas in a blend and hoping that it comes out perfect is silly.

    There are other ideas that weren't mentioned, too. Example: your character never changes but the world does in such a way as to increase your power and influence. Example: your character never changes but the vehicle of which you are captain can be upgraded and the NPCs you hire can be of different quality.

    Richard

    PS: Google blog search, if you're wondering how I got here.

     
  • At 12:37 AM, Blogger Lost said…

    I appreciate that you had the time to stop by and respond and I have to admit that I am also surprised/flattered.

    >I hadn't. It's something I've been meaning to write for about 3 months, but I only just got around to doing so.

    I tend to practice self-degrading humor, along with just having a generally odd sense of humor (hence the twist on Shakespeare).

    >The design is, but the players may not be.

    Point taken. And as you pointed out in “Newbie Induction: How Poor Design Triumphs in Virtual Worlds”, players judge all virtual worlds as a reflection of the first one that they got into. And to a certain degree there very well could be a certain amount of self-sacrificing to the first one that breaks away from the established model(s) of MMO design. While Second Life has its share of naysayers/controversy (related to the PR), it has helped propel the idea that MMOs don’t have to all about grind.

    >There are other ideas that weren't mentioned, too.

    I have to admit to a certain degree, that I am also a victim of first world that I played in. So I tend to look for elements that could be applied to “fantasy” world setting. But I have come to appreciate games that aren’t strictly “fantasy” because of the lessons they have to offer.

     

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